Ian Brittain – Coventry University, UK

As Principal Investigator for this project and after several months of planning and organising I have to admit that my over-riding feeling at the end of the week was one of relief! Relief that we had no major issues, relief that we had some really good discussion and relief that we had brought together a great group of people who all got on really well and were all committed to the aims of the project.

I have to give special thanks to David McGillivray for his assistance in writing the bid, Andrea Faull and Becs Foster for organsing a really interesting programme for the two days at Worcester and Nick Fuller, former Head of Education at London 2012 and Elliott Johnson from the Activity Alliance for giving such interesting and thought provoking guest presentations to the group in Coventry. A big thank you also is due to three of my PhD students (1 former, 2 current) for doing a great job presenting their own research to the group.

A special mention must also go to the five Japanese participants who I had the pleasure of picking up from the airport and spending the two days before the project with. Despite jet lag and being in a strange country and culture (none had been to the UK before) still engaged fully and helped to make the week the success it was.

In terms of the project I think the thing we realised very quickly was that the things that might differentiate between the UK and Japanese participants were far outweigh by the things that united us and it soon became clear that there was lots we could learn from each other and lots we can achieve if we work together.

As a sociologist and Paralympic historian I particularly enjoying being able to take the participants to the opening of the National Paralympic Heritage Trust Museum at Stoke Mandeville, which rather fortuitously coincided with their visit. Meeting Paralympians from all eras from the 1960s to today as well as Sir Philip Craven and Eva Loeffler, Sir Ludwig Guttmann’s daughter enabled us to better understand the importance of what it is we are trying to achieve as a result of this project and to give it historical context.

As a result of some really good discussions we were able to settle on four or five research themes that will form the basis for our discussion when we next convene in Tokyo at the end of June. If that week is as successful as this one then we will be well on our way to our end goal of a successful larger funding application to carry out the research and to contribute to a successful Tokyo 2020 legacy by increasing the number, knowledge and experience of researchers working at the intersection of critical disability studies and sport in Japan.

As Principal Investigator for this project and after several months of planning and organising I have to admit that my over-riding feeling at the end of the week was one of relief! Relief that we had no major issues, relief that we had some really good discussion and relief that we had brought together a great group of people who all got on really well and were all committed to the aims of the project.

I have to give special thanks to David McGillivray for his assistance in writing the bid, Andrea Faull and Becs Foster for organsing a really interesting programme for the two days at Worcester and Nick Fuller, former Head of Education at London 2012 and Elliott Johnson from the Activity Alliance for giving such interesting and thought provoking guest presentations to the group in Coventry. A big thank you also is due to three of my PhD students (1 former, 2 current) for doing a great job presenting their own research to the group.

A special mention must also go to the five Japanese participants who I had the pleasure of picking up from the airport and spending the two days before the project with. Despite jet lag and being in a strange country and culture (none had been to the UK before) still engaged fully and helped to make the week the success it was.

In terms of the project I think the thing we realised very quickly was that the things that might differentiate between the UK and Japanese participants were far outweigh by the things that united us and it soon became clear that there was lots we could learn from each other and lots we can achieve if we work together.

As a sociologist and Paralympic historian I particularly enjoying being able to take the participants to the opening of the National Paralympic Heritage Trust Museum at Stoke Mandeville, which rather fortuitously coincided with their visit. Meeting Paralympians from all eras from the 1960s to today as well as Sir Philip Craven and Eva Loeffler, Sir Ludwig Guttmann’s daughter enabled us to better understand the importance of what it is we are trying to achieve as a result of this project and to give it historical context.

As a result of some really good discussions we were able to settle on four or five research themes that will form the basis for our discussion when we next convene in Tokyo at the end of June. If that week is as successful as this one then we will be well on our way to our end goal of a successful larger funding application to carry out the research and to contribute to a successful Tokyo 2020 legacy by increasing the number, knowledge and experience of researchers working at the intersection of critical disability studies and sport in Japan.

As a result of some really good discussions we were able to settle on four or five research themes that will form the basis for our discussion when we next convene in Tokyo at the end of June. If that week is as successful as this one then we will be well on our way to our end goal of a successful larger funding application to carry out the research and to contribute to a successful Tokyo 2020 legacy by increasing the number, knowledge and experience of researchers working at the intersection of critical disability studies and sport in Japan.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *